Tansaekhwa (monochromatic painting)

"Starting in the mid-1960s, a group of Korean artists began to push paint, soak canvas, drag pencils, rip paper, and otherwise manipulate the materials of painting in ways that prompted critics to describe their actions as “methods” rather than artworks"



Ha Chonghyun Conjunction 74-26, 
1974 Oil on canvas



Blum &Poe announces From All Sides: Tansaekhwa on Abstraction, (September 13-November 8, 2014) a large-scale survey of Korean monochromatic painting from the 1960s to the 1980s. Consisting of more than thirty-five seminal paintings, the show is the first major overview of Tansaekhwa in North America, focusing on six of its most representative artists: Chung Sang-hwa, Ha Chonghyun, Kwon Young-woo, Lee Ufan, Park Seobo, and Yun Hyongkeun.  

From the mid-1960s and especially during the 1970s, Tansaekhwa artists variously pushed paint, soaked canvas, dragged pencils, ripped paper, and otherwise manipulated materials in ways that productively troubled the distinctions separating ink painting from oil, painting from sculpture, and object from viewer. Mostly rendered in white, cream, black, brown, and other neutral hues, Tansaekhwa works invited and deflected the gaze of the viewer in ways that enabled audiences to affirm their own sense of presence, an effect with significant implications against the backdrop of authoritarian South Korea. By the early 1980s, Tansaekhwa was the first Korean artistic movement to be successfully promoted internationally. Viewers in Seoul, Tokyo, Taipei, and Paris saw in its most representative examples the possibility of imagining what a distinct contemporary Asian art might look like, thus setting off a pattern of recognition that anticipated what is described as contemporary art's "global turn."  






Yun Hyongkeun Umber-Blue , 1976 
Oil on cotton 31 1/2 x 25 3/4 inches




  
Ha Chonghyun Work 74-05, 1975 
Oil on hemp


The show is curated by Joan Kee, Associate Professor of History of Art at the University of Michigan and a leading authority on contemporary Asian art. Her book, Contemporary Korean Art: Tansaekhwa and the Urgency of Method (University of Minnesota Press, 2013), was one of four finalists for the Charles Rufus Morey Award, which honors an especially distinguished book in art history by the College Art Association. The exhibition will be accompanied by a substantial catalogue with over one hundred images, narrative artist biographies, twelve newly translated artist texts, and a scholarly essay by the curator featuring previously unpublished archival sources.


Photography by David John
More info at Blum and Poe here




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La Valise, Mexico City: a new project designed by Chic by Accident

"The design emphasizes avant garde Mexican modernism pioneers from the twentieth century, and the hotel maintains a strong tie to the arts through an ongoing artist residency program."





While I was in Mexico City a few years back, I reached out to Emmanuel Piccault of Chic By Accident, a designer responsible for some exceptionally creative interiors pushing Mexican Modernism into the international spotlight. The morning we met him in the Roma Norte, he took us on a walking tour of the  two locations where he had opened the concept driven Chic by Accident and Dead by Accident (images here).  In the midst of touring Dead by Accident, a quite strong earthquake began the shake the walls and ceramics, and then abruptly stopped.  Emmanuel Piccault's Chic by Accident is responsible for the new townhouse for rent, La Valise in the Colonia Roma Norte. "The design emphasizes avant garde Mexican modernism pioneers from the twentieth century, and the hotel maintains a strong tie to the arts through an ongoing artist residency program."   Looking forward to staying here on our next trip to Mexico City! - David John






La Valise is your home away from home, a luxurious townhouse with three unique luxury suites.   The design emphasizes avant garde Mexican modernism pioneers from the twentieth century, and the hotel maintains a strong tie to the arts through an ongoing artist residency program.  The hotel is located in the Colonia Roma Norte, a cultural center of Mexico City. Built in the early twentieth century, La Roma is a quiet neighborhood with an eclectic collection of colonial, art deco and neoclassical houses on tree-lined streets filled with contemporary art galleries, independent clothing stores, restaurants, and many trendy nightlife venues. 





"On the first floor of a building of the Porfirian era, the candor of the twentieth century architecture contrasts with simplicity and contemporary elegance.  A symbiosis between Mexican and European sensibilities informs the perspective of Chic by Accident. A black velvet Marcel sofa and a center table covered with crocodile skin are contrasted by terracotta pups from Colima by French-Mexican artist Carlos Ranc— which, reinterpreted, turns them into the guardians of the space.  Style does not come at the expense of comfort. The bedroom features a luxurious king size bed covered with Vivenda cotton textiles and cushions by Maggie Galton, as light filters in from an adjacent courtyard where an artisanal Yucatecan hammock and a swing float as if time stood still.  A separate room next to the terrace contains a kitchen with refrigerator, electric grill, coffee and tea with delicious baked goods by Panadería Rosetta, bottled water by Casa del Agua, and a variety of fresh fruits and nuts.  The shower room, separate from the bathroom, features a white bathtub, which contrasts with colorful handmade geometric tiles that again solidifies the fusion between European and Mexican styles."










"The bedroom features a luxurious king size bed covered with Vivenda cotton textiles and cushions by Maggie Galton, as light filters in from an adjacent courtyard where an artisanal Yucatecan hammock and a swing float as if time stood still...."









"La Valise breaks the myth that sequels are never good. Chic by Accident’s curated interiors highlight the contrast between the light finish of the wood floors with an eclectic red carpet and iron chairs. A velvet armchair sits below circular lamps from the 1970s, which illuminate black leather-covered shelves emerging from the walls.  The interventions by interior designer Emmanuel Picault do not go unnoticed. Between the bedroom and the living room, a fiberglass ‘moon’ crosses the space unexpectedly. In an alcove, the queen size bed, featuring textiles by Vivenda and a hand-embroidered bedspread from the artisanal workshops of Maggie Dalton, is flanked by two bedside tables covered with dark green leather. Chromed handblown glass lamps illuminate the space.  

As elsewhere in the hotel, Mexican style permeates again the atmosphere. A copper, sisal and green leather armoire holds wool blankets handmade in the nearby state of Mexico and extra goose-down pillows, inviting you to take a nap or enjoy a good book.  The bathroom, painted Mexican Pink, pays tribute to the architect Luis Barragán—this vibrate tone was one of his favorite colors.  A corridor leads to the shower room, equipped with a bench to rest and a white bathtub. A large window in a marble and mosaic frame allows plenty of natural light to stream into the space."  
















"The interventions by interior designer Emmanuel Picault do not go unnoticed. Between the bedroom and the living room, a fiberglass ‘moon’ crosses the space unexpectedly. "







The bathroom, painted Mexican Pink, pays tribute to the architect Luis Barragán—this vibrate tone was one of his favorite colors.  A corridor leads to the shower room, equipped with a bench to rest and a white bathtub. A large window in a marble and mosaic frame allows plenty of natural light to stream into the space.
 





"The best kept secret Hotel La Valise is the surreal third and final suite. On the top floor, the desire to sleep under the stars becomes a reality.  The king size bed can easily move from inside the bedroom to the rooftop terrace.  The living room combines the key elements of Chic by Accident: wood, velvet and metal. A fireplace with blown glass spheres and a pair of framed paintings allude to a syncretism of influence from both France and Mexico.  "











Visit La Valise here..
Visit past articles about Chic by Accident here. 



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upcoming book: Commune, Designed in California

"Commune perfectly captures this spirit and embodies a new California style that freely mixes old and new in its layered, highly personal interiors that embrace color, pattern, and texture. "




Very much looking forward to this upcoming books by Abrams Press! Commune's work has been highly influential to our work in interior design, and the spread of the California design aesthetic.

Commune: Designed in California - Book signing with Roman Alonso, Steven Johanknecht, Pamela Shamshiri, and Ramin Shamshiri Sunday, November 2nd, 4-6:00 PM.

"Commune was established in Los Angeles in 2004 by four like-minded souls—Roman Alonso, Steven Johanknecht, Pamela Shamshiri, and Ramin Shamshiri— with a common mission: to enhance life through design and to blur the lines between disciplines, eras, and styles. California is for those who refuse to conform and who live for freedom of expression, indoor/outdoor living, and that golden sunshine glinting off the waves of the Pacific. Commune perfectly captures this spirit and embodies a new California style that freely mixes old and new in its layered, highly personal interiors that embrace color, pattern, and texture. This book is the first monograph of Commune’s work, featuring its designs for private residences, hotels, commercial spaces, and restaurants, as well as the works they specially commission from virtually everyone in the artisan craftsman movement in California today".
 
 
 
 
 
 
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(dec)curation
@ R and Company, New York 



(dec)curation 
 Curated by Steven Volpe 
16 September - 18 October 2014 

Designers: Lina Bo Bardi, Milo Baughman, Michael Boyd, Wendell Castle, Joe Colombo, Martin Eisler, Greta Magnusson Grossman, The Haas Brothers, Carlo Hauner, Poul Kjærholm, Hun-Chung Lee, Oscar Niemeyer, Isamu Noguchi, Gio Ponti, Guiseppe Scapinelli, Sergio Rodrigues, Joaquim Tenreiro, Christian Wassmann, David Wiseman, Jeff Zimmerman  

 R & Company is pleased to announce (dec)curation, an exhibition curated by Steven Volpe, Founder and Principal of the San Francisco-based design firm, Steven Volpe Design. For this exhibition, Volpe explores the concept of (dec)curation through arrangements of objects and furnishings from R & Company's comprehensive collection of iconic historical and contemporary works. The exhibition will be on view 16 September through 18 October. An opening reception will be held Tuesday, 16 September, 6-8pm. Mr. Volpe will be present at the opening.

more here. 



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Parachute Market : 
Ever Present : Sept 20-21, Los Angeles





Upcoming Los Angeles design fair: Parachute Market

CNTRLgroup is pleased to present Parachute Market Ever Present, co-curated by Bianca Chen and Coryander Friend. The thematic design fair and marketplace is debuting inside the new 30,000 square foot JF Chen showroom in West Hollywood. For the first time, Ever Present will provide public access to collections from an impressive selection of Los Angeles’ most respected vintage dealers. Alongside these antiquaries will be a select group of current designers who will unveil new works.  With the absence of the Los Angeles Antique Show this year, Ever Present is bringing a true design fair back to Los Angeles, offering a unique opportunity to see some of the most exciting objects, old and new, from Los Angeles and beyond. The event will feature installations from established collectors including JF Chen, Reform Gallery, The Window, Inheritance, Big Daddy Antiques, Cliff Fong and Parasouk Rugs. Confirmed object designers include 100xBTR, Wolfum, Doug McCollough, Chris Earl, Stephen Kenn, Otto Design Group, Untitled Rug, Jason Koharik, Atelier de Troop, and Mary Little
Presentation space will mix both dealers and designers together.




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a visit to the courthouse 
(Santa Barbara) 1929 

"So, please just blow out all the candles, blow out all the candles 
"You're too old to be so shy," he says to me so I stay the night 
It's just a young heart confusing my mind, but we're both in silence 
Wide-eyed, both in silence Wide-eyed, like we're in a crime scene."













all photos taken by david john
lyrics by Daughter.


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new works by 
Matthew Ronay @ Marc Foxx, LA

"I'm always searching for that tranquil place from which to experience fully 
and without fear, good and bad, wounding and healing."




"Organ/Organelle"
Sept 6- Oct 4, 2014

Read a past interview with Matthew Ronay on You Have Been Here Sometime

The space as a "mystical space."  What does this mean to you?  

It's not something I say a lot, but I think part of what I do is to participate with forms and symbols in a habitual way, hoping to have some self discovery. Is that part of a mystical path? I think so, but I wouldn't presume so. My participation in it veers more towards fantasy and the personal than it does the spiritual, although to me spiritual is intensely personal anyway. I really enjoy the structure of ritual and the psychological state I think it brings on. I'm always searching for that tranquil place from which to experience fully and without fear good and bad, wounding and healing. But literally being in the studio has it's purifying qualities, like the first artist, it's primordial struggle to understand and untangle, to create imagery spontaneously out of a need to emphasize what is moving and harmonious. 
 
visit Marc Foxx here.




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new works by Thilo Heinzmann

His works with pigment, for example, display that powdery dust, they exhibit it in its material concreteness, as one of the many specimens of matter that make up our world; but they also transform it into chromatic fields, exploring its wide yet subtle palette, letting color perform as it should after it has been freed of the burdens of representation. 




Thilo Heinzmann

Cloud Clear Horizon
August 28 - September 27, 2014 

Galerie Perrotin, Hong Kong, is pleased to announce “Cloud Clear Horizon”, Thilo Heinzmann’s first solo show in Asia.  Heinzmann is a painter in the emphatic sense of the word, fully invested in reinventing and recalibrating that medium’s capacities, while keeping a keen eye on that artform’s rich history. One of the central tenets of Heinzmann’s work lies in revisiting painting’s Western tradition with both of its prime historical momentums in view: painting as the superior medium for showing the world; and, after it had achieved its momentous triumph in retreating to its own means, painting as the field for a powerful interaction of form, color, texture, surface, after the rupture of abstraction. Heinzmann’s work revisits this epochal break and harnesses it into a dichotomy that his art elegantly puts into play.  His works with pigment, for example, display that powdery dust, they exhibit it in its material concreteness, as one of the many specimens of matter that make up our world; but they also transform it into chromatic fields, exploring its wide yet subtle palette, letting color perform as it should after it has been freed of the burdens of representation. (text taken from here)








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DISC Interiors in LA Times  

"I want my home to be beautiful,  but I don't want it to be precious." 





DISC Interiors featured in the LA Times!

"Many of our clients seek modern furnishings in their Spanish homes," said DISC Interiors. "With the ceiling height and beams, Spanish homes really lend themselves to modern furnishings."  Modern touches in Chow's traditional home include brass stick lighting by New York designer Billy Cotton, faux paneling wallpaper in the guest room by Obilis, a custom cloud chandelier by Apparatus in the dining room and a graphic bed and headboard upholstered with Japanese-inspired Templeton fabric.






"The eclectic mix includes striking mirrors by Mexico-based Casamidy and modern furnishings by young New York designers like the Egg Collective. 












A chance to re-think the California "light and space" movement.

"I was no longer in the water but rather I was high above the water and looking down upon it. The sky, that had been so grey and lowering, was iridescent with indescribable beauty. 
Waves of ecstatic and delicate color vibrated around me and lulled me to a sense of peace beyond comprehensions." - Robert Kyle Beggs Case-Book of Astral Projection





"I think the descriptions of near-death experience, descriptions of light phenomena in the dream, and in waking ... I don't pretend to have a religious art, but I have to say, it is artists who worked that territory from the very beginning." —James Turrell, 1999  

“CLEAR” brings together works by twenty-three contemporary artists exploring subjects reflective, transitory, crystalline, or celestial by traversing concepts of clarity sourced from art history, science, and esotericism.  The late 1960s saw the emergence of the California Light and Space Movement, tangential to Minimalism, with protagonists such as James Turrell, Larry Bell, and De Wain Valentine. They created works predicated on the extrasensory potential of light by using the space within and around it as an immersive frame, heightening the viewer’s awareness of the mind-body experience. “CLEAR” imagines a continuation of this narrative, suggesting astral projection—leaving one’s physical body to inhabit an “astral” one—as an endgame. The exhibition explores apertures both material and conceptual, as well as the rich sensibilities that visualize the science and fantasy of aesthetic experience and popular imagination.

via Gagosian



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new paths emerging
aka
"when exterior becomes interior"

"The transitions between inside and outside, culture and staged nature, become fluid and transitory – and the progress of the visitor through the museum becomes a central issue.








I once had mountains in the palm of my hand 
Rivers that ran through every day 
But I must have been mad, never knew what I had  
'Til I threw it all away (Madeline Peyroux)



1. Olafur Eliasson Riverbed 20.8.2014 - 4.1.2015

"Olafur Eliasson's take on Louisiana is radical, fascinating and unique. The central work in the first solo exhibition at the museum by the Danish-Icelandic artist is a huge, sitespecific project that reverses the relation between nature and art.  The transitions between inside and outside, culture and staged nature, become fluid and transitory – and the progress of the visitor through the museum becomes a central issue. Eliasson’s exhibition is an enhancement of our gaze at the museum, at ourselves and at the world.  Olafur Eliasson's exhibition at Louisiana engages with the museum’s unique identity. The exhibition consists of three sections that each thematize the encounter between Eliasson’s art and Louisiana as a place. The central work, Riverbed (2014), is based on the unique connection between nature, architecture and art that characterizes the museum. Transforming the entire South Wing into a rocky landscape, Eliasson focuses on inhabiting space in a new way and inserts new patterns of movement into the museum. (via here)

2. Staircase image, source currently unknown.

3. YOU by Urs Fisher :"Urs Fischer has reduced Gavin Brown’s Enterprise to a hole in the ground, and it is one of the most splendid things to have happened in a New York gallery in a while. Experientially rich, buzzing with energy and entropy, crammed with chaos and contradiction, and topped off with the saga of subversion that is central both to the history of the empty-gallery-as-a-work-of-art but also to the Gavin Brown experience itself, this work is brimming with meaning and mojo. It was also a Herculean project.

In a very minimalist yet surreal and expressionistic way, You makes space palpable. Initially the chasm dominates your vision and takes over the room, like Magritte’s painting of a giant green apple filling space. As your vision adjusts, your inner ear goes into high gear as you realize that while standing at floor level you’re no longer at the base of the gallery but halfway up the walls. The room transforms into something unmoored, like a Tiepolo or Correggio painting. As you survey everything from this unfamiliar perch, your eye takes over and details come into focus. This I-can-see-everything realism echoes the experience of paintings by Ingres and David.  "

via here, in 2007.
image via here.


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Miri Mara Ceramics, Carpinteria, California 

I think I'm going back to California 
Somewhere distant and it's all far away 
It's so far, it's so far far away  
I think I'll drift across the ocean now. (Mazzy Star, California) 



works displayed at Miri Mara, including an original lamp design


 Last week I traveled up to Santa Barbara, racing the morning light as it danced across the grinning Pacific Ocean. Along the way I stopped into Miri Mara, a small ceramics studio and gallery in Carpinteria, a beach town (which is the home to the world's largest pine tree! seen here.)   The gallery and studio is next to an automotive store, and Miri Mara is home in an industrial brick building that is built-out with drift wood.  Earthy black and white ceramics displayed on exquisite surfaces casting shadows and creating quiet conversations in the small shop.  

The works are created using a slip-casting technique, a once popular form to create ceramic works here in the U.S. We received a wonderful tour from the assistant who demonstrated the subtle shifts of surface techniques that can be achieved using brushes, teeth, and combs.  

Beautiful works! - David John




inside the back studio of Miri Mara






more information via here.

Clouds look so clear in your eyes 
Let me dream all my, let me dream all my friends  
I think I'll fly across the ocean 
I can watch the sky turning grey 
I think I'm going back, I think I'll go back  
I think I hear the whisper of my own best friend
 I think I hear the bells ringing in the square California, California 
 


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the works of  Takeshi Omura 

"I don't wanna be alright. I don't wanna feel just "OK". 
I wanna see everything. I wanna go everywhere. 
I wanna settle down, hey lover. 
I wanna run away, daydreamer..." (Neil Halstead)






 "Look for ocean walls, to gaze upon 
These distance stars, yeah, these distance suns 
Are all the reasons, are all the reasons 
The only season in my life" (Neil Halstead "Seasons)

"After graduating from the Arts & Sciences and Ceramics program at Tajimi Technical High school, Takeshi Omura studied under well known potter, Keisuke Iwata. In 2007, after severals years of producing his work at "Studio MAVO" in Tajimi, Omura returned to Fukuoka where he set up his own kiln. Omura's ceramics are characterized by their thin, almost metal like quality and unique coloration."

more info here. 





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