new work by Brion Rosch

I know you had it hard 
I know you had it hard 
I know you had it hard and you wanted to tell me 
Oh I don't want to hear it " (Electrelane)

"Brion Rosch’s creative process, which involves searching for, manipulating and layering found materials, is evocative of the archaeological process of digging for evidence of a lost culture.  The people of the Nazca culture, who flourished from 100 BC to 600 AD on the southern coast of Peru, didn’t leave a historical record in the form of a written language."










Brion Rosch has become not only a friend (although we've never met...), but an artist I've come to deeply admire. I've watched Brion's work over the past 5 years take many turns, but each is an attempt to express the inexpressible, to make connections to something this is not present, or a thought that has yet to form. His gestures and language often border on the intentionally ridiculous, but always are bold and assured, and upon first glance, perhaps that is their sword. Over time, his work has revealed a quiet confidence, and a willingness for flirty comparison with other modernist artists grappling with form, color, gesture, connection, and the void. - David John


BRION NUDA ROSCH: FORMS & OBJECTS JULY 18—AUGUST 30, 2014 


Adams and Ollman is pleased to present Forms & Objects, an exhibition of new work by Brion Nuda Rosch on view with a selection of Pre-Columbian Peruvian ceramics.  Rosch’s assemblages—made with materials that are humble in origin and slightly altered or transformed—are presented on pedestals where they defy easy categorization as paintings or sculptures, insignificant or monumental. These poetic, slight works works, united by a single color—a deep, earthy red-brown— and dominated by a simple shape—a rectangle, irregular and often missing a corner, are ambiguous in form and meaning, yet call to mind signposts that mark and highlight the ancient objects in the room.  

United by several themes, across time, place and intention, Rosch's contemporary works and the Pre-Columbian Peruvian pottery are found, fragmented, abstract, and guided by rule and ritual. Rosch’s creative process, which involves searching for, manipulating and layering found materials, is evocative of the archaeological process of digging for evidence of a lost culture.  The people of the Nazca culture, who flourished from 100 BC to 600 AD on the southern coast of Peru, didn’t leave a historical record in the form of a written language. Their cups, vases, and effigy forms, while highly abstract, contain illustrations of anthropomorphic creatures and ritualistic trophy heads that provide us with insight into these ancient peoples. Similarly, a central shape—a paired down head or bust—pushes Rosch's works into the realm of figuration. 







Brion Nuda Rosch Blank Form, 2014 acrylic, paper on found book page 11 x 9 inches



"Working within the context of Pre-Columbian Peruvian pottery, Rosch further expands his practice of constructing or reconstructing narrative and identity through objects. Together, they gesture towards a reconsideration of the historical material and our relationship to the object and its history.

How much can we know from what little we are given? 
What have we unearthed and how can we piece it together? 
What do we value and what do we hold sacred?"



 



Brion Nuda Rosch This Form is Intentionally a Form to Potentially Represent a Portrait, 2014 acrylic, paper, artist frame, wood 19 x 15 3/4 x 2 1/2 inches



Adams and Ollman 
811 East Burnside #213 
Portland, Oregon 503.724.0684  



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new LA design gallery:  HILDEBRANDT STUDIO

"In Search of Modern features examples of seminal work by modernist designers, architects, furniture makers and ceramicists and it engages the contemporary viewer in a discourse on design during the modern industrial boom, a socially progressive era and a trend of thought that affirmed the power of human beings to create, improve and reshape their environment with the aid of practical experimentation, scientific knowledge and technology." 






In Search of Modern  
 July - August, 2014 

HILDEBRANDT STUDIO is pleased to announce In Search of Modern, a collective exhibition reflecting on the notion of form and function in American and European design during the 20th century. The title of the exhibition stems from Marcel Proust’s novel “A la Recherche du Temps Perdu (In Search of Lost Time)”, a prominent literary work of the 20th century. Certain affinities with the novel can be found at the core of this exhibition, in the sense that the focus of the novel, much like the focus of this exhibition, is not necessarily on the development of a coherent evolution, but rather on a multiplicity of perspectives, and on the formation of experience. In Search of Modern features examples of seminal work by modernist designers, architects, furniture makers and ceramicists and it engages the contemporary viewer in a discourse on design during the modern industrial boom, a socially progressive era and a trend of thought that affirmed the power of human beings to create, improve and reshape their environment with the aid of practical experimentation, scientific knowledge and technology. The rise of modern design to public prominence indicates that the distance in perspective between modernism and contemporary is less than often assumed. 

This exhibition contributes to the ongoing process of absorbing one of the most influential and inventive times in design and architecture. The exhibition features the work of: Gae Aulenti, Eileen Gray, Greta Grossman, Charles and Ray Eames, Charles Pollock, Paul McCobb, Milo Baughman, Ben Seibel, Hans Wegner, Torbjorn Afdal, Robert Maxwell, David Cressey, John Follis, Malcom Leland and La Gardo Tackett.   







HILDEBRANDT STUDIO 
5880 Blackwelder Street 
Los Angeles, CA 90232 
Gallery Hours: 12-7 pm 
Tuesday - Saturday By Appointment Only 




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DISC Interiors : 
Sunset Idea House 2014: Manhattan Beach
Project photos.  Opens August 1

 

Kid's room mural in progress: by Londubh Studio


We've been working on this project for almost a year now, and we are excited that we are in the final stretch!  Our version of the modern beach house opens to the public August 1 in Manhattan Beach.  We are excited to be working with so many talented artists, ceramicists, painters, lighting designers, and carpenters. More pics to come, along with all the contributors. - David John

Follow our process on Sunset Magazine's site here.




kitchen islands pendants and cabinetry installation




dark stained floor to ceiling cabinetry



 Sabine Hill Cement tile with marble and white oak cabinetry for the master bathroom




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Ryuichi Sakamoto 
vs 
Lucio Fontana






An attempt to connect sounds with vision.


1. "Like his home country of Japan, Ryuichi Sakamoto can be categorised completely objectively under one word: pioneering. He's an old man now, but whilst many might associate age with being stuck in the past or unable to change, Sakamoto has led his career on exactly opposite principles. Born in 1952, he's lived a life that's found it's own chronological parallels in music. As a young boy learning piano, he became fascinated by Debussy. As a teenager, he found himself listening to The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, and later on - much to the disapproval of his classical teachers - electronic pioneers like Kraftwerk." text via here.

2. Concetto Spaziale, Attese, executed in 1960, is an important work in the oeuvre of Lucio Fontana that has been an undeniable highlight in Andy Warhol’s collection until his death in 1987. It is an outstanding example of the work to come out of the Spazialismo (Spatialism) movement, founded by the artist in 1947. Six carefully remeditated cuts run across the thinly painted monochromic canvas, emphasising the physicality of this work. It is charged with energy of the physical act of the artist slashing the surface with the knife. This physical act or gesture became the central idea of Spatialism, to the extent that it figured in the movement’s ‘First Spatial manifesto’: “it doesn’t matter to us if a gesture, once accomplished, lives for a second or a millennium, for we are convinced that, having accomplished it, it is eternal” (in E. Crispolti and R. Siligato, eds., Lucio Fontana, Milan, 1998, p. 118). Through the use of gesture, Fontana was in fact one of the first artists to perceive art as a performance. In the ‘Technical Manifesto of Spatialism’, Fontana elaborates on Spatialism’s ambitions: “Painted canvas no longer makes sense… What is needed… is a change in both essence and form. It is necessary to go beyond the painting, sculpture and poetry… In the praise of this transformation in the nature of man, we abandon the use of known forms of art and move towards the development of an art upon the unity of space and time” (in M. Gooding, Abstract Art, London, 2001, p. 88). via here.



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Lean out, lean out 
The light in Who wants to sing? 
And I truly believe 
Used see what you see 
That you cant overlie us 
We will find the solution 







And that we,and that we,and that we 
We shall see what you see 
We shall see what you see


1. Mark Rothko
2. Peter Zellner's Matthew Marks Gallery in West Hollywood CA
3. Hundred Water's latest album is pure magic. A feast for the eyes, ears, and heart.


"Music is one of the dominant ways of experiencing being alive and so in a way, it’s more than just hearing. It’s about articulating feelings, stories and attitudes. I also feel as though an album or a piece of music almost has a sense of place inside it if it’s good. It takes a lot out of you to really apprehend music fully so I think it does relate to the other senses.

Music for me is story telling, so I usually start with an intention or something I want to say. From there I kind of struggle around in the dark, trying to find ways to say that. Sometimes it’s a linear thing where I have an idea and then go about trying to find ways to express it. Other times I will discover things along the way and the idea ends up turning into something else altogether. It’s a mixture between intention and chance.   

I think the reason I write music is because I’m trying to say things that I find difficult to encapsulate verbally. Music is its own kind of language and it’s very good at saying things that words struggle with, so that’s often the impulse for me. " - Max Richter, composer,  taken from an interview here.




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Recent kitchen inspirations...
exploring texture, materials, stone, wood, black and natural tones
















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"memories they come and go, some are sweet and some are low" 
 vs.
“I’ve had enough darkness in my life, I’m ready for some light.”

 



images :

1. Francis Harris, Leland: "Reverting to his own name has allowed Harris to produce arguably his most organic, ostensibly his most honest and without doubt his saddest body of work to date. The first few times I listened through I was unaware of the album's backstory, but even without this knowledge it was impossible to come away without a sense of it; sorrow permeates almost every aspect of every track. Some of this is down to the collaborations. Greg Paulus' trumpet has never sounded as heartbroken, Emil Eabramyan's achingly beautiful cello floats like ash on the wind, and Danish singer Gry Bagoien contributes delicate, lingering vocals to a handful of songs. However, it's Harris' production itself that delivers the majority of the emotional payload. " listen here.

2. CTO lighting. more here.




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"All of his work has a simple, but perfect flowing line and the surfaces are either smooth and finely sanded or rough and brushed achieved through a variety of techniques, such as brushing, bleaching, staining, varnishing and oiling.."




the works of Friedemann Buehler

"Buehler’s vessels ‘open our eyes to the tree’s true nature, its history, its coming of age, its singularity... [Buehler’s] subtle balance between nature and art echoes through the circular movement of the turning process, which pushes with such force against the materialized slowness of the wood’s growth. The possibilities provided by the medium unleash his creative language, which speaks to us clearly through the metaphoric content of his work.’ - Schnuppe von Gwinner, Managing Director of Craft2eu, Germany  

Buehler’s turning technique is complex and time- consuming, and results in breathtaking monumental forms. All of his work has a simple, but perfect flowing line and the surfaces are either smooth and finely sanded or rough and brushed achieved through a variety of techniques, such as brushing, bleaching, staining, varnishing and oiling. The combination of craftsmanship and artistry bring out the unique beauty of the wood and result in pieces of timeless elegance, not only pleasing to the eye, but also to the touch.  

The artist selects his wood very carefully, using mostly oak and ash, preferring wood from the forests of Hohenlohe, a small region in the northern part of Baden-Württemberg, Germany. After selecting the felled trees, Buehler immediately goes to work in the forest using an axe and a chain saw to form rough planks. The rest of the work is done in the studio where some of the planks are soaked in large water containers and then turned wet and finally dried. Other planks are roughly turned and set aside to dry. It can take years before these turnings are completed. "




text and image taken from here.



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"The garden chamber comes with a terrace, which is grounded with white gravel and ceramic pots and trees creating a Mediterranean and relaxed feeling. When entering the space you should be taken by a feeling of contemplation and relaxation and think: I feel at home here." - Van Duysen





"Graanmarkt 13 is a restaurant, a shop and a gallery all under one roof. Each floor looks out onto a picturesque square where trees reveal the passing of the seasons. This desirable address is also the home of owners Tim and Ilse. They live there with their family, on the top floor. Tim and Ilse fell in love with the house and transformed it into a haven for those in search of special things with a soul. Everything on display has its own story."






Can you describe this unique garden chamber?

Van Duysen: It’s a light flooded space on the top floor with one wall sheltering a fire place, functioning as the heart of the room, covered by 17th century old wooden beams. The apartment offers fantastic views on the city and its surrounding trees. The garden chamber comes with a terrace, which is grounded with white gravel and ceramic pots and trees creating a Mediterranean and relaxed feeling. When entering the space you should be taken by a feeling of contemplation and relaxation and think: I feel at home here.

What does the concept of luxury mean to you?

Van Duysen: It’s not about glitter and glamour, it’s about comfort and feeling at home. This is one of the reasons why I do not like boutique hotels. The apartment at Graanmarkt 13 is not a conventional hotel, it serves as a magical location where people can reside for a short or long term and feel at ease. It fits in the story of Tim and Ilse and the philosophy behind Graanmarkt 13. The apartment is cozy. You feel secure and you are guaranteed of an immaculate service behind the scenes.

excerpt of interview taken from here.. 




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‘The spider – why the spider? Because my best friend was my mother
and she was deliberate, clever, patient, soothing, reasonable, dainty, subtle, 
indispensable, neat, and as useful as a spider… 
I shall never tire of representing her.’ -  Louise Bourgeois L’araignée et les tapisseries


 

Spider, 2003 Stainless steel and tapestry



15 June – 26 July 2014

"Hauser & Wirth Zürich is pleased to announce an important solo presentation of works by Louise Bourgeois. This exhibition is the most comprehensive overview of Bourgeois’s tapestry works to date, including previously unseen pieces made between 1996 and 2008. Comprised of almost 30 works, and with important loans from private collections, this is the first time that Bourgeois’s tapestry oeuvre has been brought together, offering a new perspective on her late practice.  

The materials and techniques related to tapestry weaving are profoundly connected to Bourgeois’s childhood experiences. Bourgeois’s mother and maternal grandparents originated from the French town of Aubusson, famed for its tapestry industry. Her parents owned a gallery in Paris where her father sold antique tapestries, while her mother ran the tapestry restoration workshop in Choisy-le-Roi and, later, in Antony. Bourgeois’s incorporation of tapestry into her wider practice draws on personal memories of working alongside her mother in the workshop. Nowhere is her maternal relationship explored in more depth than in Bourgeois’s spider and tapestry works.  

For Bourgeois, the process of making art was a means of working through personal trauma, transmitting and expelling emotion into her artistic materials. Her work allowed for a process of unraveling the unconscious in an attempt to discover the origins of her feelings. Towards the end of her life, Bourgeois’s oeuvre became consumed with exploring her relationship with her mother, replacing a prior preoccupation with her father. The persistent cutting and destructive impulses present in her earlier works dissipated in favour of themes of reparation and construction. Consequently, Bourgeois gravitated towards the familiar techniques from her childhood – stitching, weaving and embroidery – to process her feelings towards her mother."




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Made in L.A. 2014  
at Hammer Museum



Ricky Swallow, Standing Open Structure No. 1, 2014, patinated bronze and oil paint, 
7 3/4 x 6 1/2 x 4 inches unique 


 Made in L.A. 2014 : Artists included: Juan Capistrán,  Danielle Dean, Harry Dodge, Lecia Dole-Recio, Kim Fisher, Judy Fiskin , Magdalena Suarez Frimkess & Michael Frimkess, Mariah Garnett, Gerard & Kelly,  Samara Golden, Piero Golia, Marcia Hafif , Channing Hansen, Jibade-Khalil Huffman, James Kidd Studio, Barry Johnston, KCHUNG, Devin Kenny, Gabriel Kuri, Caitlin Lonegan, Los Angeles Museum of Art, Tala Madani, Max Maslansky, Emily Mast, Jennifer Moon   Brian O’Connell , Harsh Patel,  Marina Pinsky, Public Fiction, Sarah Rara, A.L. Steiner, Ricky Swallow, Tony Greene: Amid Voluptuous Calm, Clarissa Tossin,  Wu Tsang

Opening Jun 15  New. Art. Now.  The Hammer's biennial exhibition Made in L.A. 2014 features works by 35 Los Angeles artists with an emphasis on emerging and under recognized artists. It debuts recent work and new painting, installation, video, sculpture, photography, and performances created specifically for the exhibition. Made in L.A. 2014 will be installed in every gallery at the Hammer Museum. The exhibition is organized by the Hammer chief curator Connie Butler and independent curator Michael Ned Holte. The exhibition will be accompanied by a comprehensive hardcover catalogue, as well as a full roster of free public programming. 





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DISC Interiors featured on Domaine

We aim to create warm and calm rooms — rooms that feel quiet, yet complex,” the duo share. For their latest project, they embraced the Mediterranean architecture of their client’s home and brought their signature California spin to the interiors. (more here)
 


lighting by Apparatus, vintage rug, custom upholstered chairs


Our latest project in Santa Monica was featured on Domaine this week!

“Our initial mood board reflected a peaceful palette of neutral colors punctuated by soft grays, burnt oranges, vintage leathers, woven jutes, and warm brass tones.” "The clients requested a masculine look that felt warm, earthy, relaxed, and California modern.” A blend of Spanish-influenced furnishings, rugged textures, and brass accents enable this dreamy vision to come to life. - Domaine


 











 landscape design by Mark Tessier, more here..





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ABCDCS : David Collins Studio by Assouline

But is it beautiful?”, is a frequent question I ask myself and the people I work with. It is a shallow and not very democratic question, but I do think that if I try to create something beautiful, in itself a very personal and subjective goal, then I can at least justify its existence and the thought process behind it. Beauty surrounds us, but it is often hidden, overwhelmed by the excesses of what else is present. My job is to expose and exploit the beauty in my work.  - David Collins




Assouline presents "ABCDCS" David Collins Studio

An elegant and astonishing new book of David Collin's work is released this June by Assouline. A powerful collection of images and text written by David Collins, and his thoughts and reflections of color, nature, imagiantion, youth, and more.


“I have always wanted to see things I imagine made into a reality,” renowned architect David Collins once said, a statement that rings powerfully true in the projects of his eponymous studio. Featuring a foreword by Madonna, ABCDCS showcases a bold portfolio of images that manifest the architect and interior designer’s creative vision, one that pervades the contemporary aesthetic. Presented alphabetically to reveal David Collins’ myriad influences and inspirations and the motifs within his Studio’s work, this volume is a visually captivating journey from A to Z. The much-loved and talented David Collins set up his eponymous Studio in 1985, assiduously gathering around him an expert team of designers and architects of diverse disciplines. Across the next 28 years, David Collins Studio has redefined how people live in public and private, creating timeless and beautiful spaces, each of which exhibits a definitive sense of place, whether a hotel, restaurant, residence or retail space. -" text via ABCDCS







"Inspired by the approach of 20th century modernist titans like Eileen Gray, Le Corbusier and Mies van der Rohe, David and Iain envisaged a studio that employed a team covering all elements of interior and architectural practice."









"I have always wanted to see the things I imagine made into a reality. This, rather than being a designer or an architect, is what has driven me to try to succeed in a fairly gruelling profession. I did briefly think that fashion or film could be the job for me, but they are both vulnerable to snap judgements and critical reactions. If you design something to please everyone you please no one. If you design to please yourself the result is transitory. But at the same time any work I have done that I have been pleased with has been the result of doing something simple but well. But simple is not easy and the process of building something is complex. I do not think of myself as particularly talented but I do consider that I am particularly hard-working and passionate or rather committed to doing my best. I can only live with order and work with order too – I like to categorise everything – from art to influences to people to work. That is why I can often pull disparate influences and materials together and make a narrative which may be invisible to the casual observer but reveals itself over time and experience."









Thank you David Collins.

Visit Assouline here. 





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