"Ain't I a giver, don't I deliver in black for morning tea?
Long hair raker, deep dark acre, you've gone and lost just me.
We've got to keep on, got to keep on, keeping on" (tiny ruins)





Perhaps it is the weather turning oh so quickly.
As the breathe becomes short and the days stretch with the giver.
The color of green stains everything. A tattoo.
Pebbles catching the cat's eyes. - David John









1. Image unknown
2. Pope Valley Pottery, photo by Mimi Giboin
3. Vintage Lamp, source forgotten.


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The Gilded Owl

"While collaborating on the renovation and redesign of a 1785 federal style house in Hudson, New York Andy and Elizabeth conceived a new vision for a unique retail space."



One of my favorite design blogs, The Gilded Owl,  
opens a retail space in Hudson, New York. Congrats Andy!


"While collaborating on the renovation and redesign of a 1785 federal style house in Hudson, New York Andy and Elizabeth conceived a new vision for a unique retail space. after years of neglect and stripping the house back to its stunning origins the rooms unfolded as a sequence of spaces that would allow the two and a half year old blog to become a real living gallery. The designers and artists that have inspired The Gilded Owl founders to write about and photograph the details of their exemplary work will be harmoniously exhibited together. Thus allowing visitors to be inspired by design and the way creative forces influence the way we live."










Visit The Gilded Owl here..


If you want to know a secret 
What are you waiting for? 
If you want to ask me something
I can tell you so much more 
If you want to cause me trouble 
It's not up to me 
I know that there's something missing










lyrics by Caribou "back home"
photographs, sources unknown.




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a conversation with Michael Felix 

"My family mostly wants me to be successful in an American Dream kind of way. They’re Old School. My grandfather grew up in an Italian family in Cincinnati and had an arranged marriage with my Italian grandmother. And my mom grew up in South America. So I think they still carry that immigrant mentality."



 "The standard sofa"


"you don't fall far from the tree now."  - bob moses

Last December on an extremely dark and rainy afternoon in Los Angeles, Nathalie, a good friend took me to the studio of furniture designer Michael Felix.  Luckily, Michael's studio happens to be only a block away from where I live in downtown LA.  The Arts District is a neighborhood that is quickly transforming with art galleries (Hauser and Wirth, Ibid, Museum as Retail Space) and small boutique stores, restaurants, and young designers. Michael recently moved into his studio space, which is subdivided with many other artists and designers in a beautiful decaying 1920's paint factory building. We talked for a few hours about the intention of Michael's works, the first year start-up of his line, and his family history, of being a 3rd generation upholstery designer. There are an incredible amount of furniture designers working and emerging in Los Angeles at the moment, but very few I know of that are 3rd generation. Michael's work is both a nod to the past in technique, material, and familiar forms, and a request for entry into the future. Eager to see where he takes this collection.  Thanks Michael for the conversation.   - David John

"Michael Felix is a handcrafted furniture company that designs and produces upholstered goods in Southern California. A 3rd generation upholstery designer, Michael started from the ground up as a sample-maker’s assistant in the furniture factory founded in 1959 by his grandfather. His in-depth understanding of classic upholstery techniques makes for a collection that is thoughtfully designed, structurally engineered and made for a lifetime of use.  Each piece of furniture is made to order by hand in California, allowing for a maximum amount of customization of fabrics and finishes. Michael also designs custom furniture solutions for commercial and residential projects."  




"the friends stool"







Michael Felix











 A converation with Michael Felix:

Describe your working background and how you came to launch your own furniture line? 

After high school I was taking art classes and looking for a part time job. I was interested in design but didn’t have a specific focus so I decided to work at my dads upholstery company, learning from the ground up and apprenticing with the sample makers. It was a great way to immerse myself in the process and I also became really good friends with the craftsmen. After a couple years I became more involved and started designing for some of his clients. And eventually came to the point where I thought it would be fun to do my own thing.

When did you launch your own furniture line?

I launched my line about a year ago.

What is your specialty? 

My specialty is upholstered goods because I have access to incredible craftsmen and production. I’m currently working on some wood items at the moment like shelving and side tables.

Is there a lot of pressure on you from your family since you're a third generation furniture designer and decided to branch out on your own?

My family mostly wants me to be successful in an American Dream kind of way. They’re Old School. My grandfather grew up in an Italian family in Cincinnati and had an arranged marriage with my Italian grandmother. And my mom grew up in South America. So I think they still carry that immigrant mentality.

What are some of the challenges you faced when you first started your own line? 

A lot of challenges were small business style obstacles and the stress of doing something new. Believing in it but also not really knowing what it will be or how things will work.

Where is your furniture made? Everything is made in LA and the surrounding areas.

Since you come from a lineage of furniture designers, what is something one should consider when picking out a great sofa?

I’d say being comfortable would be the most important thing and of course the quality of the construction from sewing to the frame. The quality of the cover is important too. It’s what you’ll see all the time.

How much influence does your family have in what you design? 

I ask them what they think of things because they have a lot of experience. But in the end I trust my gut and everything is my decision


visit Michael Felix's site here. 
photography by Brandon Wickenkamp


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THIS IS NOT A TIME FOR DREAMING.....
vs.
"today we escaped for lunch 
to the museum, 
to the secret world of Pierre Huyghe"

 




"This exhibition marks the first major retrospective of the work of Pierre Huyghe (b. 1962, Paris). Huyghe creates films, installations, and events that blur fact and fiction, reinvent rituals of social engagement, and use the exhibition model as a site for playful experimentation. Organized thematically, the exhibition covers more than two decades of Huyghe's career, with a focus on cinema as both model and matrix. By filming staged scenarios, Huyghe probes the capacity of art to distort and ultimately shape reality through methods that are filmic, spatial, or social.  In keeping with the artist’s desire for a non-hierarchical presentation, the exhibition is designed as a single, extraordinary environment, like a park or garden: a public sphere where a visitor can walk, reflect, and take in a variety of attractions through participation, thoughtful immersion, or simply as a passer-by."

more here.. 



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Anish Kapoor @ Regen Projects

"A series of monumental works feature organic, terrestrial forms made from resin and earth. In contrast to their raw, earthly matter, a series of highly polished stainless steel sculptures reflect and refract an illusion of the world onto their mirrored surfaces and confound the viewers’ relationship to the space around them."




Anish Kapoor 
January 31 – March 7, 2015 

"Regen Projects is pleased to present an exhibition of recent work by the London-based artist Anish Kapoor. One of the most influential sculptors of his generation, Kapoor’s work combines the formal concerns of minimalism with concerns for the material and psychical nature of both the object and the self. Known primarily for his large site-specific installations and objects that test the phenomenology of space, this exhibition features significant new work that pushes his use of materials into exciting new territories.





"Kapoor has shown with Regen Projects since 1992 and this marks the artist’s fifth solo exhibition at the gallery.      A series of monumental works feature organic, terrestrial forms made from resin and earth. In contrast to their raw, earthly matter, a series of highly polished stainless steel sculptures reflect and refract an illusion of the world onto their mirrored surfaces and confound the viewers’ relationship to the space around them. Similarly, several monochromatic voids appear to float on the gallery walls, their concave interiors play with the viewers’ perception of surface and depth and create the illusion of infinite space reflected in their void like interiors. A trio of amorphous wall sculptures entitled Keriah (I, II, III) refer to the Jewish mourning practice of clothes tearing. Visceral and raw, their shapes hang on the wall as if in a perpetual state of decay. "  

more here.
new book: ‘I DON’T KNOW': Interviews on Architecture and Craft

"As it turned out, 
no one really knew what was going to happen." 





"Starting from ‘I Don’t Know’ documents a 2011 week-long workshop at Sitterwerk, St. Gallen, in which Studio Mumbai’s Bijoy Jain joined expert craftspeople from Switzerland to share the knowledge, techniques, and insights from their own practices with students, artists, and architects. The interviews in this book explore the creative potential of hands-on learning, local knowledge, and open experimentation. Celebrating the role of chance and collaboration in the process of making, Starting from ‘I Don’t Know’ makes an argument for bringing together the oft-separated areas of architecture and craft early in the design process."

more here...


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"Mr Postman, do you have a letter for me? 
Mr Postman, do you have a letter for me? 
A letter for me From my own true love 
Lost at sea 
Lost at sea"  - the decemberists








1. "Cheim & Read is pleased to announce Landline, an exhibition of six new paintings by the Irish-American painter Sean Scully. Begun in 2013, Scully’s Landline series resonates with newfound urgency and freedom. Thick horizontal bands of subtly-layered color provide his compositions with rhythmic pulse, while the interactions between striations of paint bristle with energy. Though reminiscent of the physical landscapes which inspired them, Scully’s canvases are activated by an emotional and intuitive terrain.
The retrospective, Follow the Heart: The Art of Sean Scully 1964–2014, curated by Philp Dodd will be on view at the Himalayas Art Museum in Shanghai until January 25. This exhibition will travel to the CAFA Museum in Beijing from March 13–April 23. Scully is the first western abstract artist to have a museum tour in China. Scully also has major upcoming exhibitions at Pinacoteca do Estado in São Paulo from April 11–J uly 11 and at the Palazzo Falier in Venice from May 9–November 22."

2. Source unknown




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Thomas Houseago

'Moun Room' is comprised of three chambers contained within one another. The spaces Houseago has conceived with 'Moun Room' – extending both within and outside the structure's physical walls – invite meditation upon movement and codes of behavior in response to architecture. The artist has described this work as 'a visual maze with a spiritual dimension" 





Hauser & Wirth is pleased to present 'Thomas Houseago. Moun Room', an immersive environment that represents a departure for the artist. Houseago is most widely identified with monumental sculptures of the human body, figures admired for their brute physicality and potent tactility. Drawing upon and deftly subverting classical sources, the artist creates forms that hover between power and vulnerability, old and new worlds. 










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"Down the long driveway, you'll see it. "
 
new photography book 
by Mary Gaudin 



I've followed Mary Gaudin's photographic work for a few years now and I continue to be always captivated by her eye and the stories that go along with her works. I was lucky and honored to have her do a guest post on You Have Been Here Sometime a year or so ago. Her post was about a modernist apartment she stayed in for the weekend. (Read her post here..  "It must have been a startling sight. This was postwar public housing. It was idealistic modernism...")  A few years earlier, I interviewed Mary Gaudin about her "Lifebooks" (Read the interview here..). Her recent book, "Down the long driveway, you'll see it." is a continuation on these familiar themes of architecture, and how spaces affect our psyche. Homes and the stories that become them, and how they are reflected in the materials, the furnishings, and the age that happens as life goes on.  Visit her website for more information here.. - David John








Down the long driveway, you'll see it.    

"This is a book of pictures of modernist, mid-century  New Zealand homes. The houses aren't new, they’re old and lived in. They can be a little dusty, slightly worn around the edges and all have what antique dealers like to call “patina”. But they’re perfect in the minds of the people who live in them because of what they represent, which when designed, was a better way of living

The idea for the project wasn’t so much to document the houses in purely architectural terms, but to give an idea of the way these houses were and are lived in, as well as showing details of the designs and the materials used in their construction. The use of native timbers throughout these houses has given a unique feel to the interiors. In the Martin house, for example, John Scott used rimu for cupboard doors and matai, a wood which darkens with age, for the handles. 

I also wanted to look at the way these houses fitted into their surroundings. All of the Wellington homes are connected to native bush, attracting tuis, fantails and bellbirds amongst other native birds. The owners of the Einhorn house, which backs onto the Karori bird sanctuary, sometimes see rare hihi feeding in their garden. The front of the Manning house is surrounded by an enormous pohutukawa tree which, from inside the house filters views out towards Auckland Harbour Bridge. 

The title of the book comes from a phrase in an email from Bruce Martin giving directions to his home at Bridge Pa. Filled with a lifetime of pottery both from Bruce and Estelle’s work, together with gifts from potter friends, the Martin’s home highlights the particular mix of craftsmanship and design which is reminiscent of all the homes shown in this book." 

Mary Gaudin is a New Zealand photographer living in Montpellier, France.  
Photographs by Mary Gaudin Text by Matthew Arnold



















go to Mary Gaudin's site here.



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Alma Allen

"Many of Allen’s new sculptures, made of marble, travertine, and Claro walnut, weigh several tons. Despite their solidity, the works appear to undulate and vibrate, as if they are about to be sucked in or pushed out by some external force to the point of dissipation." 




Alma Allen
January 10 – February 28, 2015
Opening reception: Saturday, January 10, 6–8pm

"Blum & Poe is pleased to present an exhibition of new sculpture by Alma Allen. This is Allen’s first exhibition with Blum & Poe and his first solo gallery presentation in Los Angeles.
Working primarily in stone, wood, and bronze, Allen’s mid- and large-scale sculptures had never been publicly shown before their inclusion and wider discovery in the 2014 Whitney Biennial. A teenage runaway without a high school degree, the self-taught artist began an initial period of intense hand carving using salvaged materials while often homeless. Demonstrating an attunement with imbalance and precariousness, Allen’s sculptural forms are a marked departure from iconic stone carvers Constantin Brancusi and Isamu Noguchi, to whom his untrained sensitivity for shape and material have been compared. Recurring forms in Allen’s work take a cue from quantum particles and body organs and make indirect associations to psychological pain and wonder.
Many of Allen’s new sculptures, made of marble, travertine, and Claro walnut, weigh several tons. Despite their solidity, the works appear to undulate and vibrate, as if they are about to be sucked in or pushed out by some external force to the point of dissipation. In a series of bronze sculptures, the edges of an unknown trajectory are revealed, as tensive and fluid as the expanding universe. Presented in groupings and as individual forms, Allen’s sculptures arrive out of inherent chaos and chance provided by nature, as well as the precision of technological operation and mastery, all the while suggesting a range of anthropomorphic and visceral associations.

The obstinate sincerity of Allen’s work belies a process as anti-scriptural as the work itself. After repeated injury from obsessive over-carving left Allen unable to use his hands for extended periods, the artist built a large-scale robotic system out of spare assembly-line parts and developed its proprietary software as a mechanized extension of hand carving. The feat of engineering with emerging technology, rather than relying on third-party fabricators, allows Allen to continue his devotion to immediacy and reckless intuition in the creation of labor-intensive sculptures. Instead of being Untitled, all works in the exhibition are referred to as Not Yet Titled. In the smallest curve in Allen’s works, and in their weighted sensuality and bare longing, is an ongoing consideration of the moment before loss and/or becoming."


more here...
Willer Gallery

"I am an obsessive researcher, I love being in the library, figuring out the roots, the links, the relationships and the influences.”  - Rebecca Willer





If there’s anything I set out to achieve, it’s that I want the look to be like the objects have grown with the person,” says Willer. “Our clients are discerning. They are people who travel, experience different cultures and who are very interested in the arts. We help them reflect their lifestyles in their decor.” Charming, perceptive, interested and interesting, Willer has confidence in what she knows but also confidence to be excited about learning more, all the time. “I am an obsessive researcher,” says Willer. “I love being in the library, figuring out the roots, the links, the relationships and the influences.” This approach to design and life is in Willer’s DNA. “My father was a diplomat towards the end of his career and when he travelled, what he always wanted to know was ‘What are the most special artefacts of the local cultures?’ and ‘What can we ship back?’ I can’t imagine not responding to my environment that way; even when I was a student, living on a shoestring, my room didn’t look like anyone else’s – for pennies, it looked different. I say my approach has always been spare, not forced, certainly accumulated over time.

 (text taken from here...) 





Paul Mathieu 'Aria' chaise, bronze & Abigail Simpson vessel




Mathilde Penicaut table lamps



more info here..



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I’ve long been interested in loops, mistakes, trance-y repetition. 
It’s like writing a novel with pages missing in all the right places. —Harmony Korine 





Harmony Korine 
December 28, 2014 - January 31, 2015
Eden Rock Gallery St. Jean, St. Barthélemy


Gagosian is pleased to present recent paintings by Harmony Korine at Eden Rock Gallery's new location on top of the iconic hotel Eden Rock in St. Barths.  Korine’s cult films of the past twenty years—from the surreal Gummo (1997) to Spring Breakers (2012), a contemporary film noir in which four college freshwomen are drawn into a murderous labyrinth of events—merge reality with fiction and hand-held camerawork with precise montage. This heady mix of the unplanned, the seductive, and the outlandish crystallizes in his lesser known, highly tactile paintings. Eschewing brush and professional paint in favor of Squeegees, leftover household paint, and masking tape, he creates loosely sequential images that echo the sonic and visual leitmotifs of his films. The accumulative hypnotic effect of the paintings is offset by lifelike randomness and impulsive energy.  

Fidget Malt Crew and Slotty (all works 2014) are inhabited by shadowy, clawed creatures reminiscent of Goya’s ghastly Caprices, obscured by layers of housepaint, sprayed with letters, and repainted over the course of several years. The rows of circles and squares that cover every inch of Fflobby Check and Slausenraver Check yield sudden variations that vacillate between considered and spontaneous mark-making, while rainbow-hued, striated paintings comprising hundreds of horizontal lines hint at distant perspectives. Korine sticks pieces of bubble wrap, plastic, and paper to the canvas as he works, imbuing the optical depths with physical relief. These fossilized scraps embody dual narratives: as literal records of process, their skeletal silhouettes also suggest drifting specters, echoing the animated wraiths of more overtly figurative works such as Tinchy Sinchy and Frost Ball Junior High. Deliberate and erratic, repetitious and random, Korine’s paintings are born of fierce life forces, conflictual yet interdependent.


more info here..


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